Saturday, September 14, 2013

The Scott Motorcycle comes to call

We had a rare treat today with a visit by 9 Scott motorcycle enthusiasts - and their bikes! 

After gathering at Scott enthusiast Kenneth's house near Dromara, a spectacular run through the hills culminated in soup, cake and tea at the Turnip House.

It was a delight to see these magnificent machines - some almost 100 years old, in such great condition, and under tender care.

Here's an extract from the Scott Owners' Club website:

The Scott Legend
Say the word ‘Scott’ to a vintage motorcyclist and watch his or her response: it will be either that of enthusiasm or loathing. The Scott Motorcycle never has been mediocre ! During the 1920’s and 1930’s, when Scott Motorcycles were at their peak, a dedicated throng of enthusiasts ensured these motorcycles gained an almost cult like status: the icons of this cult were the legendary Squirrels, Super Squirrels and Flying Squirrels.
Alfred Angus ScottThe Scott machine was the product of an engineering genius called Alfred Angas Scott (1874 - 1923). His first motorcycle was built using a homemade twin cylinder engine installed into the steering head of a modified bicycle. He went on to produce a motorcycle which, on paper at least, would not look out of place in a modern motorcycle catalogue: his machine incorporated water cooling, telescopic forks, low slung weight and a lightweight duplex frame giving superb road holding. This was the Scott of 1908 (90 years ago!) and these features were to remain an integral part of the Scott motorcycle for the next 70 years.

thanks to


sold by A Wood &; Sons, Donnybrook Dublin - in 1924!

a beauty

twin cylinder

Engine no. Y7237

quite a line up

gathering Scotts

chrome radiator

air intake - no filter!

Scott of Shipley, Yorkshire

battery in need of charge!

old - and new

admirers, all the way from Minnesota

the precursor to SatNav!

group shot; after soup tea and cake

Friday, September 06, 2013

Red Kite Update

Red Kite and Mourne Mountains
It's been a mixed few months for our beautiful and magnificent Red Kites, with 5 suspicious deaths, and 14 fledglings.

The RSPB who do magnificent work with these creatures have released their Summer Newsletter which updates the situation.

You can download a free copy via our website